Featured Titles for April



From the 1920's

A Farewell to Arms
by Ernest Hemingway

The best American novel to emerge from World War I, A Farewell to Arms is the unforgettable story on an American ambulance driver on the Italian front and his passion for a beautiful nurse.

From the 1920's

Red Harvest
by Dashiell Hammett

When the last honest citizen of Poisonville was murdered, the Continental Op stayed on to punish the guilty -- even if that meant taking on an entire town.

From the 1930's

A Coffin for Dimitrios
by Eric Ambler

A chance encounter with a Turkish colonel leads Charles Latimer, the author of a handful of successful mysteries, into a world of sinister political and criminal maneuvers. At first merely curious to reconstruct the career of the notorious Dimitrios, whose body has been identified in an Istanbul morgue, Latimer soon finds himself caught up in a shadowy web of assassination, espionage, drugs, and treachery that spans the Balkans.

From the 1940's

For Whom the Bell Tolls
by Ernest Hemingway

The story of Robert Jordan, a young American in the International Brigades attached to an antifascist guerilla Unit in the mountains of Spain, it tells of loyalty and courage, love and defeat, and the tragic death of an ideal.

From the 1950's

The Old Man and the Sea
by Ernest Hemingway

The Old Man and the Sea is one of Hemingway's most enduring works. Told in language of great simplicity and power, it is the story of an old Cuban fisherman, down on his luck, and his supreme ordeal -- a relentless, agonizing battle with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf Stream.

From the 1970's

Gadget Man
by Ron Goulart

A new political map of America's west coast...Its dark wit bites through a brittle, phony, not-so-far-off world, exposing its hollow insides.

From the 1970's

Peace
by Gene Wolfe

The melancholy memoir of Alden Dennis Weer, an embittered old man living out his last days in a small midwestern town, the novel reveals a miraculous dimension as the narrative unfolds. For Weer's imagination has the power to obliterate time and reshape reality, transcending even death itself. Powerfully moving and uncompromisingly honest, Peace ranks alongside the finest literary works of our time.

From the 1980's

Shadow & Claw
The First Half of the Book of the New Sun

by Gene Wolfe

Shadow & Claw brings together the first two books of the tetralogy in one volume: The Shadow of the Torturer is the tale of young Severian, an apprentice in the Guild of Torturers on the world called Urth, exiled for committing the ultimate sin of his profession -- showing mercy toward his victim. The Claw of the Conciliator continues the saga of Severian, banished from his home, as he undertakes a mythic quest to discover the awesome power of an ancient relic, and learn the truth about his hidden destiny.

From the 1980's

Sword & Citadel
The Second Half of the Book of the New Sun

by Gene Wolfe

Sword & Citadel brings together the final two books of the tetralogy in one volume:The Sword of the Lictor is the third volume in Wolfe's remarkable epic, chronicling the odyssey of the wandering pilgrim called Severian, driven by a powerful and unfathomable destiny, as he carries out a dark mission far from his home.The Citadel of the Autarch brings The Book of the New Sun to its harrowing conclusion, as Severian clashes in a final reckoning with the dread Autarch, fulfilling an ancient prophecy that will forever alter the realm known as Urth.

From the 1990's

Groucho Marx, Master Detective
by Ron Goulart

In this inventive mystery set in Hollywood's golden era, Ron Goulart revives America's favorite cigar-wielding comic--Groucho Marx. Needing a project to occupy him between movie stints, Groucho agrees to act in a radio serial. But when a beautiful starlet is found dead before production even begins, Groucho is determined to find out who killed her.

From the 2000's

An Evil Guest
by Gene Wolfe

Lovecraft meets Blade Runner in a stand-alone supernatural horror novel. Gene Wolfe can write in whatever genre he wants--and always with superb style and profound depth. Now following his World Fantasy Award winner, Soldier of Sidon, and his stunning Pirate Freedom, Wolfe turns to the tradition of H. P. Lovecraft and the weird science tale of supernatural horror.

From the 2010's

A Borrowed Man
by Gene Wolfe

It is perhaps a hundred years in the future, our civilization is gone, and another is in place in North America, but it retains many familiar things and structures. Although the population is now small, there is advanced technology, there are robots, and there are clones. E. A. Smithe is a borrowed person. He is a clone who lives on a third-tier shelf in a public library, and his personality is an uploaded recording of a deceased mystery writer. Smithe is a piece of property, not a legal human.

From the 2010's

Doc Savage: The Sinister Shadow
by Lester Dent and Will Murray

When millionaire Lamont Cranston and attorney Ham Brooks are kidnapped by gunmen driving a black hearse, it spells trouble for Doc Savage. Trouble with compound interest when Cranston's personal lawyer is mysteriously murdered before he can consult with celebrated criminologist George Clarendon-who is secretly The Shadow!

From the 2020's

Interlibrary Loan
by Gene Wolfe

E. A. Smithe is a borrowed person, his personality an uploaded recording of a deceased mystery writer. Smithe is a piece of property, not a legal human. As such, Smithe can be loaned to other branches. Which he is. Along with two fellow reclones, a cookbook and romance writer, they are shipped to Polly's Cove, where Smithe meets a little girl who wants to save her mother, a father who is dead but perhaps not. And another E.A. Smithe... who definitely is.

From the 2020's

Lest Darkness Fall & Timeless Tales Written in Tribute
by L. Sprague de Camp

The 2021 edition (Lest Darkness Fall and Timeless Tales Told in Tribute) includes two brand new stories by Harry Turtledove and David Weber. Similar, thematically, to Mark Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, the book tells the tale of Martin Padway who, as he is walking around in modern Rome, is suddenly transported though time to 6th Century Rome.

From the 2020's

The Hemingway Stories
by Ernest Hemingway

The power of the Ernest Hemingway's revolutionary style is perhaps most striking in his short stories, and here readers can encounter the tales that created the legend: stories of men and women in love and in war and on the hunt, stories of a lost generation born into a fractured time. This collection is a perfect introduction for a new generation of Hemingway readers and a vital volume for any fan.

 

 

Featured Authors for April


Ron Goulart

Pulp Historian, Pulp Style Ghost Writer, and author of numerous Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Detective stories all displaying his unique style of humor and satire.

More from Ron Goulart

Jan 13, 1933 --
Author

Primary Genres




Ernest Hemingway

"For a true writer each book should be a new beginning where he tries again for something that is beyond attainment. He should always try for something that has never been done or that others have tried and failed. Then sometimes, with great luck, he will succeed." -- Ernest Hemingway from his Nobel Prize acceptance speech

More from Ernest Hemingway

Jul 21, 1899 -- Jul 02, 1961
Author, Journalist

Primary Genres




Gene Wolfe

Hailed as one of the literary giants of SF and Fantasy, Gene Wolfe has repeatedly won the field's highest honors, including the Nebula, the Hugo, and the World Fantasy awards.

More from Gene Wolfe

May 07, 1931 -- Apr 14, 2019

Primary Genres




Featured Articles

A CARROLL JOHN DALY FAN LETTER by Mickey Spillane
This letter is a long time in the writing. It was meant for you years ago, but has never been started until now. Through Scott Meredith I located you... and I didn't want any more water to go under the bridge before this goes in the mail.

Who Wrote The Spider Written By: Robert Sampson, Joel Frieman, and Robert Weinberg
Originally, when the first research was being done on the character pulps, Norvell Page was given credit for all of the novels that appeared in the Spider pulp under the name Grant Stockbridge, with the first two novels in the series being written by R.T.M. Scott. Page's identity as author was no major secret as it was listed in numerous writing digests and Henry Steeger had even written to several pulp fanzines mentioning Page as the Spider author.

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